Flora & Fauna

Flora & Fauna

The Greens Bayou Wetlands Mitigation Bank is home to a wide assortment of wildlife and vegetation, including a few rare and unusual mammals, birds and plants. Thirteen species of amphibians have been documented on-site, along with 157 species of birds, 22 species of fish, 95 species of invertebrates, 15 species of mammals and 15 species of reptiles. One notable bird species is the White-faced Ibis, Plegadis chihi, which is listed as "threatened" in Texas. A family of bobcats, Lynx rufus, also has been spotted here. Other species of note include bald eagles, Haliaeetus leucocephalus; river otters, Lontra canadensis; and alligators, Alligator mississippiensis. Beavers, Castor canadensis, are at work on dams in several locations within the Greens WetBank. Many of these species have been seen by Flood Control District biologists and field technicians; others were spotted in surveillance footage taken by game cameras set around the property.

Approximately 552 species of vegetation have been found within the site. This includes the rare Houston Camphor Daisy, Rayjacksonia aurea, which is classified as a Texas "species of greatest conservation need." These are species that, due to limited distributions and/or declining populations, face the threat of eradication or extinction but lack legal protection. Greens WetBank also is home to the carnivorous Drosera plant, aka sundew. In 2001, Cyperus cephalanthus (also known as buttonbush flatsedge) was found on Flood Control District property at Armand Bayou that was destined to be excavated for a detention basin. The plant was rescued and transplanted within Greens WetBank. This is the first time this particular plant had been recorded in Harris County in over 100 years!

Overall, the majority of undeveloped portions of the Greens WetBank consist of mixed hardwood/pine woodlands, open marsh areas, ponds and oxbows, which are remnant loops that have been cut off from the main stream. According to historic aerial photographs, a large portion of the property was used for the commercial harvesting of pine lumber in the mid-to-late 1980s. Evidence of the resulting disturbance from this harvesting can be seen in the change of vegetation composition and the alteration of natural topography caused by the building of roads.